Defining exercise prescription in lifestyle modification programs for overweight/obese polycystic ovary syndrome women

28 11 2011

To the Editor:

We reviewed the manuscript by Nybacka et al. (1) with great interest. The authors randomized overweight/obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) to investigate the effects of different lifestyle modification approaches on ovarian function and endocrine/metabolic parameters. The patients were assigned to diet, exercise or diet plus exercise for 4 months, and at least 1-year after the termination of the programs were invited to participate in a follow-up visit. A total of 14, 17 and 12 women completed, respectively, the diet, exercise and diet plus exercise intervention after 4 months, and 7 of each group completed the follow-up visit. At the end of the study the authors’ conclusion was that “properly managed diet and exercise, alone or in combination, are equally effective in improving reproductive function in overweight/obese women with PCOS, despite the minor weight loss associated with exercise.” Read the rest of this entry »





Considerations on: “The role of inositol supplementation in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome, with insulin resistance, undergoing the low-dose gonadotropin ovulation induction regimen”

30 03 2011

To the Editor:

We read with great interest the article by Morgante et al. entitled, “The role of inositol supplementation in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome, with insulin resistance, undergoing the low-dose gonadotropin ovulation induction regimen,” which has been recently published in Fertility and Sterility.

We do have some concerns about methodology and conclusions of this study. Read the rest of this entry »





Inositol effects on ovulation induction in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

28 03 2011

To the Editor:

I read with interest the recent paper of Morgante et al (1) describing positive effects of Inositol in increasing insulin sensitivity in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (2), confirming the concept that insulin-sensitizer molecules alone or in combination with clomiphene citrate or gonadotrophin, somehow ameliorates ovulation in such patients.

However some comments on both design and results of the study are necessary for a critical view of potential clinical application of inositol in ART. Read the rest of this entry »





Pregnancy in women with PCOS

17 01 2011

To the Editor:

I read the article of Palomba et al (1) with great interest. This is the first study that investigates the pregnancy outcomes according to different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome. They conclude that “The increased risk for adverse obstetric or neonatal outcomes, which are observed in women with PCOS, varies widely according to their different PCOS phenotypes and features.” Although it is clear that the results are attractive, some of the data in this paper need further clarification. Read the rest of this entry »





PCOS is common in patients undergoing bariatric surgery in a British center

20 04 2010

To the Editor:

We read with great interest the article by Gosman et al (1). The authors highlight that 13.1% of female patients undergoing bariatric surgery had already been diagnosed with PCOS by a health care provider. Data on the incidence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in this population from outside the U.S. and the U.K. in particular are limited. Read the rest of this entry »





Comment on “Body mass index is an independent risk factor for the development of endometrial polyps in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization.”

4 03 2009

To the Editor:

We would like to make some comments on the paper by Onalan et al (1). In this paper, the authors found that obesity could be a factor in initiating the growth of an endometrial polyp because they identified obesity as the only independent risk factor using logistic regression analysis. Read the rest of this entry »